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Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl

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Helen Ruffin

1935-2014

The Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl (HRRB)

A DeKalb “Grassroots Movement” That Has Become A Statewide Reading Motivator

Mrs. Ruffin and the DeKalb Reading Bowl: Mrs. Helen Ruffin, a dynamic and innovative Library Media Specialist at Sky Haven Elementary School in DeKalb County, created a unique reading competition in 1986. It was called The Reading Bowl and, in a competitive game format, questioned students about the content of the 20 Georgia Book Award Nominees each year. Her vision was to have teams, comprised of students from different schools, compete to test their knowledge of the selected books.

This idea came to her after serving on the Georgia Book Award Nomination Committee at the University of Georgia, in 1985. This book award began in the Department of Language Education at the University of Georgia’s College of Education and its purpose, according to their website is, “to foster a love of reading in the children of Georgia, and to introduce them to books of literary excellence”. From this experience Mrs. Ruffin shared her vision with her colleagues who embraced the idea and helped her press forward.

In 2000, after Mrs. Ruffin’s retirement, several Library Media Specialists formed the DeKalb County Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl (HRRB). Other school districts in Georgia heard about this unique reading initiative and soon wanted to join in the competition.

Creating a state-wide reading initiative: In 2003-2004 the Georgia Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl (HRRB) Steering Committee was created comprised of members from The Georgia Association of Educators (GAE) and the Georgia Library Media Association (GLMA).

With the help of this Steering Committee, the Georgia Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl (HRRB) is now open to students in grades 4-12 across the state. Elementary and middle school students read and are quizzed on the 20 Georgia Book Award Nominees, while high school students read and are quizzed on the 20 Georgia Peach Teen Book Award Nominees. The books change yearly.

Forming Georgia Districts and Regions: Today, the Georgia HRRB includes six geographic competition regions; North, East, West, Metro, Middle and South. All school districts in Georgia are divided into one of these regions.

From these six regions, two competition divisions have been formed: Division 1, which consists of the North, West and Metro HRRB Regions, and Division 2, which consists of the East, Middle and South HRRB Regions.

During the last few years, over 600 schools throughout Georgia have held competitions at the local school district level and have registered online for regional competitions.

DeKalb Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl Steering Committee Members

Donna Jones — donna_l_jones@dekalbschoolsga.org

Sue Ann Prigge — sueann_m_prigge@dekalbschoolsga.org

Gwen Green — gwendolyn_c_green@dekalbschoolsga.org

Lisa Gurin — lisa_a_gurin@dekalbschoolsga.org

Barbara Hallstrom — barbara_k_hallstrom@dekalbschoolsga.org

Jenny Holloman — jenny_holloman@dekalbschoolsga.org

O’Rhonda Ingram — orhonda_d_ingram@dekalbschoolsga.org

Christine King — christine_a_king@dekalbschoolsga.orgHRRB_color_copyright

Rose Konouck — rose_m_konouck@dekalbschoolsga.org

Dr. Melinda Morin — melinda_j_morin@dekalbschoolsga.org

Dr. Evelyn W. Smith — evelyn_w_smith@dekalbschoolsga.org

Anja Tigges — anja_f_tigges@dekalbschoolsga.org

Valerie Ayer, HRRB Liaison — valerie_ayer@dekalbschoolsga.org

Instructional Coordinator, Department of Educational Media & Instructional Materials

Dr. Mary Thomas, Retired, HRRB Consultant

We Salute Mrs. Helen Ruffin, Founder of the Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl and the HRRB Steering Committee members for their contributions to the literary development of Georgia students!

 

DeKalb Reading Bowl

To participate in the Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl, elementary and middle school students must read the current Georgia Children’s Book Award Nominees. The Georgia Book Award Nominees is the Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl’s official reading list.

High school students must read the Georgia Peach Book Award for Teen Readers Nominees for the current year which is the official reading list of the Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl.

 

Rules of the Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl

  • Each school will participate in six rounds.
  • Each round will consist of 10 questions.
  • Alternates may be substituted between rounds.
  • Teams will receive 10 points for each answer.
  • There will be no penalties for wrong answers.
  • There will be five members on a team and up to five alternates.
  • A school may have no more than one team.

The winners will be determined in the following manner: The teams with the highest total points from all six of their rounds will be the winners. In case of a tie, the teams who are tied will be co-winners. Winning teams will receive a trophy for their school. In the case of a tie, neither team will receive the trophy that day. Another trophy will be purchased and engraved and presented to each of those teams at a later agreed upon date. There will be a first place, second place and third place winning teams (teams in case of a tie).

Team Selection Strategies

  • Recruit a teacher, paraprofessional and or parent to be co-sponsor and coach.
  • Encourage all students to read the Georgia Book Award Nominees
  • Teachers and sponsors make requirement for certain number of books to be read.
  • Secure AR (accelerated reader) test
  • Make multiple copies available
  • Use vendors such as Baker& Taylor, Bound to Stay Bound, Follett, Permabound, and others that carry GA. Book Award copies ( paperbacks)
  • Buy books on tape
  • Run a power point kiosk on workstations
  • Encourage purchase of personal copies on “tax free days”
  • Establish a “literary club” or type of “lunch bunch” where interested students can read and discus the books on the Georgia Award list .
  • Discuss each book with students as to its theme, plot, characters, settings, etc.
  • Give brief “book talks”
  • By December, at the latest, select possible team and alternates
    • Ask teachers for suggestions of students
    • Give test on the 20 books
    • Hold a school level reading bowl
    • Encourage input from students
  • January or before, meet with team at designated time to review books and practice questions
    • Students, sponsors, coaches make practice questions
    • Use “extra” students not on team as “coaches”
    • Encourage students to read at least four (4) of the nominees

 

Click here to view an online version of Rules of competition for Team Members and Spectators.

 

Buzzers may be located by searching the Internet for Quiz Pro Systems.

Dates & Locations


Listed below are the dates and locations for the DeKalb and Metro Region Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl Competitions. All other regions should contact their Regional Coordinator listed under the Divisions and Regions tab for their competition dates.


DeKalb HRRB — January 28, 2017 at Arabia Mountain High School

Regional HRRB — February 4, 2017 at Clayton State University

Divisional HRRB — February 25, 2017 at Pickens County Middle School, Jasper, GA

State HRRB — March 18, 2017 at University of Georgia (Children’s Literature Conference)

Divisions & Regions


There are six Georgia Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl (HRRB) Regions which are grouped into two HRRB Divisions. The Divisions and Regions are listed below.


HRRB DIVISION 1 — North, West, Metro HRRB Regions

HRRB North Region School Districts — Coordinators: Dallas Thompson, Robin Fair, northhrrb@gmail.com

Bartow, Calhoun City, Cartersville City, Catoosa, Chattooga, Cherokee, Chickamauga City, Dade, Dalton City, Dawson, Fannin, Forsyth, Gainesville City, Gilmer, Gordon, Habersham, Hall, Lumpkin, Murray, Pickens, Rabun, Towns, Trion City, Union, Walker, White, Whitfield, and non-public school organizations. (See HRRB Framework for Rules of Inclusion.)

HRRB West Region School Districts — Coordinators: Jean Cook, Stephen Williams, westhrrb@gmail.com

Bremen City, Butts, Carroll City Schools, Carroll County, Chattahoochee, Cobb, Coweta, Douglas, Floyd, Haralson, Harris, Heard, Lamar, Marietta City, Marion, Meriwether, Muscogee, Paulding, Pike, Polk, Rome City, Spalding, Talbot, Taylor, Thomaston-Upson, Troup, and non-public school organizations (See HRRB Framework for Rules of Inclusion.)

HRRB Metro Region School Districts — Coordinator: Sue Ann Prigge, metrohrrb@gmail.com

Atlanta City, Buford City, Clayton, Decatur City, DeKalb, Fulton, Gwinnett, Henry, Newton, Rockdale, and non-public school organizations (See HRRB Framework for Rules of Inclusion.)

 

HRRB DIVISION 2 — East, South, Middle HRRB Regions

HRRB East Region School Districts — Coordinators: Terrie Gribanow , Verley Dotson, easthrrb@gmail.com

Banks, Barrow, Burke, Candler, Clarke, Columbia, Commerce City, Effingham, Elbert, Emanuel, Franklin, Glascock, Greene, Hancock, Hart, Jackson, Jefferson, Jefferson City, Jenkins, Lincoln, Madison, McDuffie, Oconee, Oglethorpe, Richmond, Screven, Social Circle City, Stephens, Taliaferro, Treutlen, Walton, Warren, Wilkes, and non-public school organizations (See HRRB Framework for Rules of Inclusion.)

HRRB South Region School Districts — Coordinators: Jaime Rearley, Shan Peters, southhrrb@gmail.com

Appling, Atkinson, Bacon, Baker, Ben Hill, Berrien, Brantley, Brooks, Bryan, Calhoun, Camden, Charlton, Chatham, Clay, Clinch, Coffee, Colquitt, Cook, Crisp, Decatur, Dodge, Dooly, Dougherty, Early, Echols, Evans, Glynn, Grady, Irwin, Lanier, Jeff Davis, Lee, Liberty, Long, Lowndes, McIntosh, Miller, Mitchell, Pelham City, Pierce, Pulaski, Quitman, Randolph, Seminole, Stewart, Tattnall, Telfair, Terrell, Thomas, Thomasville City, Tift, Toombs, Turner, Valdosta City, Vidalia City, Ware, Wayne, Webster, Wheeler, Wilcox, Worth, and non-public school organizations (See HRRB Framework for Rules of Inclusion.)

HRRB Middle Region School Districts — Coordinator: Doreen Smith, middlehrrb@gmail.com

Baldwin, Bibb, Bleckley, Bulloch, Crawford, Dublin City, Fayette, Houston, Jasper, Johnson, Jones, Laurens, Macon, Monroe, Montgomery, Morgan, Peach, Putnam, Schley, Sumter, Twiggs, Washington, Wilkinson, and non-public school organizations (See HRRB Framework for Rules of Inclusion.)

Booklists

The Georgia Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl will only use the original 20 titles on the Georgia Book Awards Nominees list and the 20 titles on the Ga. Peach Teen Book Award Nominees list. There are 18 titles for the elementary students and all twenty titles from the GBA will be used for middle school students during the 2016-2017 school term.

Elementary Booklist

The Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl uses the suggested GBA list of 18 titles (2016-2017) for elementary schools. All 20 titles will be used for the middle school list. The following list is for elementary schools.

Circus Mirandus. Beasley, Cassie. (2015). New York, NY: Dial (Penguin/Random House).

When he realizes that his grandfather’s stories of an enchanted circus are true, Micah Tuttle sets out to find the mysterious Circus Mirandus–and to use its magic to save his grandfather’s life.

 

The Thing about Jellyfish. Benjamin, Ali. (2015). New York, NY: Little, Brown Books.

Twelve-year-old Suzy Swanson wades through her intense grief over the loss of her best friend by investigating the rare jellyfish she is convinced was responsible for her friend’s death.

 

The Book Scavenger. Bertman, Jennifer Chambliss. (2015). New York, NY: Henry Holt & Co.

Just after twelve-year-old Emily and her family move to San Francisco, she teams up with new friend James to follow clues in an odd book they find, hoping to figure out its secrets before the men who attacked Emily’s hero, publisher Garrison Griswold, solve the mystery or come after the friends.

 

The War that Saved My Life. Bradley, Kimberly Brubaker. (2015). New York, NY: Dial (Penguin/Random House).

A young disabled girl and her brother are evacuated from London to the English countryside during World War II, where they find life to be much sweeter away from their abusive mother.

 

Stella by Starlight. Draper, Sharon. (2015). New York, NY: Atheneum. When a burning cross set by the Klan causes panic and fear in 1932 Bumblebee, North Carolina, fifth-grader Stella must face prejudice and find the strength to demand change in her segregated town.

 

Death by Toilet Paper. Gephart, Donna. (2014). New York, NY: Delacorte (Penguin/Random House).

Contest-crazed twelve-year-old Ben uses his wits and way with words in hopes of winning a prize that will keep his family from being evicted until his mother can pass her final CPA examination.

 

Portraits of Hispanic American Heroes. Herrera, Juan Felipe. (2014). (Illus. Raul Colón). New York, NY: Penguin.

Showcases twenty Hispanic and Latino American men and women who have made outstanding contributions to the arts, politics, science, humanitarianism, and athletics.

 

Fish in a Tree. Hunt, Lynda Mullaly. (2015). New York, NY: Nancy Paulsen (Penguin).

Ally has dyslexia, and can no more read like everyone else than a fish can climb a tree. Tired of being called slow and a loser, Ally finds that in her latest new school her teacher understands her limitations and actually sees in her a creative, intelligent side. New friends with their own learning disabilities help Ally see that she can achieve success and find happiness.

 

Roller Girl. Jamieson, Victoria. (2015). New York, NY: Penguin.

A graphic novel adventure about a girl who discovers roller derby right as she and her best friend are growing apart.

 

The Terrible Two. John, Jory & Barnett, Mac. (2015). (Illus. Kevin Cornell). New York, NY: Abrams.

When master prankster Miles Murphy moves to sleepy Yawnee Valley, he challenges the local, mystery prankster in an epic battle of tricks but soon the two join forces to pull off the biggest prank ever seen.

 

Unusual Chickens for the Exceptional Poultry Farmer. Jones, Kelly. (2015). New York, NY: Knopf.

Through a series of letters, Sophie Brown, age twelve, tells of her family’s move to her Great Uncle Jim’s farm, where she begins taking care of some unusual chickens with help from neighbors and friends.

 

Half a World Away. Kadohata, Cynthia. (2014). New York, NY: Atheneum.

Twelve-year-old Jaden, an emotionally damaged adopted boy fascinated by electricity, feels a connection to a small, weak toddler with special needs in Kazakhstan, where Jaden’s family is trying to adopt a “normal” baby.”

 

Masterminds. Korman, Gordon. (2015). New York, NY: Balzer + Bray (HarperCollins).

“A group of kids discovers they were cloned from the DNA of some of the greatest criminal masterminds in history for a sociological experiment.”

 

Rain Reign. Martin, Ann M. (2014). New York, NY: Feiwel and Friends (Macmillan).

“Struggling with Asperger’s syndrome, Rose shares a bond with her beloved dog, but when the dog goes missing during a storm, Rose is forced to confront the limits of her comfort levels , even if it means leaving her routines in order to search for her pet”–OCLC.

 

The Red Pencil. Pinkney, Andrea Davis. (2014). (Illus. Shane W. Evans). New York, NY: Little, Brown Books.

“After her tribal village is attacked by militants, Amira, a young Sudanese girl, must flee to safety at a refugee camp, where she finds hope and the chance to pursue an education in the form of a single red pencil and the friendship and encouragement of a wise elder.

 

Fuzzy Mud. Sachar, Louis. (2015). New York, NY: Delacorte (Penguin/Random House).

Two middle-grade kids take a shortcut home from school and discover what looks like fuzzy mud but is actually a substance with the potential to wreak havoc on the entire world.

 

Crenshaw. Applegate, Katherine. (2015). New York, NY: Feiwel and Friends (Macmillan). A story about a homeless boy and his imaginary friend that proves in unexpected ways that friends matter, whether real or imaginary.

 

Appleblossom the Possum. Sloan, Holly Goldberg. (2015). (Illus. Gary A. Rosen). New York, NY: Dial (Penguin/Random House).

A young possum strikes out on her own and winds up trapped in a human house before her brothers can rescue her.

 

Middle School Booklist

All 20 titles of Georgia Book Award Nominees are used for the Georgia Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl Middle School Division for 2016-2017 school term.

Circus Mirandus. Beasley, Cassie. (2015). New York, NY: Dial (Penguin/Random House).

When he realizes that his grandfather’s stories of an enchanted circus are true, Micah Tuttle sets out to find the mysterious Circus Mirandus–and to use its magic to save his grandfather’s life.

 

The Thing about Jellyfish. Benjamin, Ali. (2015). New York, NY: Little, Brown Books.

Twelve-year-old Suzy Swanson wades through her intense grief over the loss of her best friend by investigating the rare jellyfish she is convinced was responsible for her friend’s death.

 

The Book Scavenger. Bertman, Jennifer Chambliss. (2015). New York, NY: Henry Holt & Co.

Just after twelve-year-old Emily and her family move to San Francisco, she teams up with new friend James to follow clues in an odd book they find, hoping to figure out its secrets before the men who attacked Emily’s hero, publisher Garrison Griswold, solve the mystery or come after the friends.

 

The War that Saved My Life. Bradley, Kimberly Brubaker. (2015). New York, NY: Dial (Penguin/Random House).

A young disabled girl and her brother are evacuated from London to the English countryside during World War II, where they find life to be much sweeter away from their abusive mother.

 

Stella by Starlight. Draper, Sharon. (2015). New York, NY: Atheneum. When a burning cross set by the Klan causes panic and fear in 1932 Bumblebee, North Carolina, fifth-grader Stella must face prejudice and find the strength to demand change in her segregated town.

 

Death by Toilet Paper. Gephart, Donna. (2014). New York, NY: Delacorte (Penguin/Random House).

Contest-crazed twelve-year-old Ben uses his wits and way with words in hopes of winning a prize that will keep his family from being evicted until his mother can pass her final CPA examination.

 

Portraits of Hispanic American Heroes. Herrera, Juan Felipe. (2014). (Illus. Raul Colón). New York, NY: Penguin.

Showcases twenty Hispanic and Latino American men and women who have made outstanding contributions to the arts, politics, science, humanitarianism, and athletics.

 

Fish in a Tree. Hunt, Lynda Mullaly. (2015). New York, NY: Nancy Paulsen (Penguin).

Ally has dyslexia, and can no more read like everyone else than a fish can climb a tree. Tired of being called slow and a loser, Ally finds that in her latest new school her teacher understands her limitations and actually sees in her a creative, intelligent side. New friends with their own learning disabilities help Ally see that she can achieve success and find happiness.

 

Roller Girl. Jamieson, Victoria. (2015). New York, NY: Penguin.

A graphic novel adventure about a girl who discovers roller derby right as she and her best friend are growing apart.

 

The Terrible Two. John, Jory & Barnett, Mac. (2015). (Illus. Kevin Cornell). New York, NY: Abrams.

When master prankster Miles Murphy moves to sleepy Yawnee Valley, he challenges the local, mystery prankster in an epic battle of tricks but soon the two join forces to pull off the biggest prank ever seen.

 

Unusual Chickens for the Exceptional Poultry Farmer. Jones, Kelly. (2015). New York, NY: Knopf.

Through a series of letters, Sophie Brown, age twelve, tells of her family’s move to her Great Uncle Jim’s farm, where she begins taking care of some unusual chickens with help from neighbors and friends.

 

Half a World Away. Kadohata, Cynthia. (2014). New York, NY: Atheneum.

Twelve-year-old Jaden, an emotionally damaged adopted boy fascinated by electricity, feels a connection to a small, weak toddler with special needs in Kazakhstan, where Jaden’s family is trying to adopt a “normal” baby.”

 

Masterminds. Korman, Gordon. (2015). New York, NY: Balzer + Bray (HarperCollins).

“A group of kids discovers they were cloned from the DNA of some of the greatest criminal masterminds in history for a sociological experiment.”

 

Rain Reign. Martin, Ann M. (2014). New York, NY: Feiwel and Friends (Macmillan).

“Struggling with Asperger’s syndrome, Rose shares a bond with her beloved dog, but when the dog goes missing during a storm, Rose is forced to confront the limits of her comfort levels , even if it means leaving her routines in order to search for her pet”–OCLC.

 

The Red Pencil. Pinkney, Andrea Davis. (2014). (Illus. Shane W. Evans). New York, NY: Little, Brown Books.

“After her tribal village is attacked by militants, Amira, a young Sudanese girl, must flee to safety at a refugee camp, where she finds hope and the chance to pursue an education in the form of a single red pencil and the friendship and encouragement of a wise elder.

 

Fuzzy Mud. Sachar, Louis. (2015). New York, NY: Delacorte (Penguin/Random House).

Two middle-grade kids take a shortcut home from school and discover what looks like fuzzy mud but is actually a substance with the potential to wreak havoc on the entire world.

 

Crenshaw. Applegate, Katherine. (2015). New York, NY: Feiwel and Friends (Macmillan). A story about a homeless boy and his imaginary friend that proves in unexpected ways that friends matter, whether real or imaginary.

 

Appleblossom the Possum. Sloan, Holly Goldberg. (2015). (Illus. Gary A. Rosen). New York, NY: Dial (Penguin/Random House).

A young possum strikes out on her own and winds up trapped in a human house before her brothers can rescue her.

 

The Marvels. Selznick, Brian. (2015). New York, NY: Scholastic.

In 1766, a boy, Billy Marvel, is shipwrecked, rescued, and goes on to found a brilliant family of actors that flourishes in London until 1900–and nearly a century later, Joseph Jervis, runs away from home, seeking refuge with his uncle in London, and is captivated by the Marvel house, with its portraits and ghostly presences.

 

The Iron Trial: Magisterium, Book One. Black, Holly & Clare, Cassandra. (2014). New York, NY: Scholastic.

Warned away from magic all of his life, Callum endeavors to fail the trials that would admit him to the Magisterium only to be drawn into its ranks against his will and forced to confront dark elements from his past.

 

High School Booklist

This list is used in the Georgia Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl for the high school competition and will be promoted in public libraries as part of the Vacation Reading Program.Georgia Peach Book Award for Teen Readers Committee.A committee of public and school librarians has compiled a list of 20 outstanding books for high school aged students to consider for the annual Georgia Peach Award For Teen Readers. Georgia Peach Book Award for Teen Readers accepts new members each spring. Committee members must be current Georgia high school media specialists/teacher-librarians or Georgia public library youth services staff. Chair: Natalie Couch, South Columbus Public Library and Vice Chair: Jim Stewart, North Gwinnett High School. For a complete list of committee members go to: http://georgiapeachaward.org/ reading-committee.


The Book of Ivy. Engel, Amy. (2014). Fort Collins, CO: Entangled Pub. In an apocalyptic future where girls from the losing faction are forcibly married to boys of the winning faction, sixteen-year-old Ivy is tasked to kill her fiancé Bishop, although when she finally meets him, he is not the monster she has been led to believe.

 

Con Academy. Schreiber, Joe. (2015). Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Con man Will Shea may have met his match in scammer Andrea Dufresne as they make a high-stakes deal that will determine who gets to stay at Connaughton Academy, one of the most elite and privileged preparatory schools in the country, and who must leave.

 

Dime. Frank, E.R. (2015). New York, NY: Atheneum Books for Young Readers. Fourteen-year-old Dime, a foster child in Newark, New Jersey, finds love and family as a prostitute, but when her pimp rejects her for a new girl, will Dime have the strength to leave?

 

An Ember in the Ashes. Tahir, Sabaa. (2015). New York, NY: Razorbill, an imprint of Penguin Random House. “Laia is a Scholar living under the iron-fisted rule of the Martial Empire. When her brother is arrested for treason, Laia goes undercover as a slave at the empire’s greatest military academy in exchange for assistance from rebel Scholars who claim that they will help to save her brother from execution”–Provided by publisher.

 

Every Last Word. Stone, Tamara Ireland. (2015). Los Angeles, CA: Hyperion. “Consumed by a stream of dark thoughts and worries that she can’t turn off, a girl coping with Purely-Obsessional OCD learns to accept herself and take control of her life through her experiences in poetry club”–Provided by publisher.

 

How It Went Down. Magoon, Kekla. (2015). New York, NY: Square Fish/Henry Holt and Co. When sixteen-year-old Tariq Johnson is shot to death, his community is thrown into an uproar because Tariq was black and the shooter, Jack Franklin, is white, and in the aftermath everyone has something to say, but no two accounts of the events agree.

 

I am Princess X. Priest, Cherie. (2015). New York, NY: Arthur A. Levine Books, an imprint of Scholastic Inc. “Years after writing stories about a superheroine character she created with a best friend who died in a tragic car accident, 16-year-old May is shocked to see stickers, patches and graffiti images of the superheroine appearing all over town”–OCLC.

 

I’ll Meet You There. Demetrios, Heather. (2015). New York, NY: Henry Holt and Co. Skylar Evans, seventeen, yearns to escape Creek View by attending art school, but after her mother’s job loss puts her dream at risk, a rekindled friendship with Josh, who joined the Marines to get away then lost a leg in Afghanistan, and her job at the Paradise motel lead her to appreciate her home town.

 

None of the Above. Gregorio, I.W. (2015). New York, NY: Balzer + Bray, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers. Homecoming queen Kristin Lattimer has a hard enough time dealing with her body, but her visit to the doctor reveals a difficult truth, Kristin is intersex, which means that though she looks like a girl, she has male chromosomes, not to mention boy “parts” and after her diagnosis is leaked to the whole school, her identity is thrown into question.

 

The Novice. Matharu, Taran. (2015). New York: Feiwel & Friends. “When blacksmith apprentice Fletcher discovers that he has the ability to summon demons from another world, he travels to Adept Military Academy where must decide where his loyalties lie. The fate of an empire is in his hands”–OCLC.

 

Paperweight. Haston, Meg. (2015). New York: HarperTeen, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers. “Seventeen-year-old Stevie is trapped. In her life. In her body. And now in an eating-disorder treatment center on the dusty outskirts of the New Mexico desert. … Her dad has signed her up for sixty days of treatment. But what no one knows is that Stevie doesn’t plan to stay that long. There are only twenty-seven days until the anniversary of her brother Josh’s death–the death she caused. And if Stevie gets her way, there are only twenty-seven days until she, too, will end her life”–Dust jacket.

 

The Sacred Lies of Minnow Bly. Oakes, Stephanie. (2015). New York, NY: Dial Books, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA) LLC. “A handless teen escapes from a cult, only to find herself in juvenile detention and suspected of knowing who murdered her cult leader”–Provided by publisher.

 

The Secret Side of Empty. Andreu, Maria. (2015), Phildelphia, PA: RP Teens. M.T. is a high-achieving high school student who is hiding the fact that she’s an undocumented immigrant in the United States.

 

Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda. Albertalli, Becky. (2015). New York, NY: Balzer + Bray, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers. “Sixteen-year-old, not-so-openly-gay Simon Spier is blackmailed into playing wingman for his classmate or else his sexual identity — and that of his pen pal — will be revealed”–Provided by publisher.

 

Sugar. Hall, Deirdre Riordan.> (2015). New York, NY: Skyscape. Sugar Legowski-Gracia wasn’t always fat, but fat is what she is now at age seventeen. Not as fat as her mama, who is so big she hasn’t gotten out of bed in months. When Sugar meets Even (not Evan; his nearly illiterate father misspelled his name on the birth certificate), she has the new experience of someone seeing her and not her body. As their unlikely friendship builds, Sugar allows herself to think about the future for the first time, a future not weighed down by her body or her mother.

 

Under a Painted Sky. Lee, Stacey. (2015). New York, NY: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA). “In 1845, Sammy, a Chinese American girl, and Annamae, an African American slave girl, disguise themselves as boys and travel on the Oregon Trail to California from Missouri”–Provided by publisher.

 

We are All Made of Molecules. Nielsen, Susin. (2015). New York, NY: Wendy Lamb Books. Thirteen-year-old brilliant but socially-challenged Stewart and mean-girl Ashley must find common ground when, two years after Stewart’s mother died, his father moves in with his new girlfriend–Ashley’s mother, whose gay ex-husband lives in their guest house.

 

When. Laurie, Victoria. (2015). Los Angeles, CA: Hyperion. Sixteen-year-old Maddie Flynn cannot help but see the death date of everyone she meets or sees in a photograph or on-screen, and her alcoholic mother exploits this by having her do readings for money, but when Maddie predicts the death of a young boy, she becomes the center of an FBI investigation.

 

Written in the Stars. Saeed, Aisha. (2015). New York, NY: Nancy Paulsen Books, an imprint of Penguin Group (USA). “Naila’s vacation to visit relatives in Pakistan turns into a nightmare when she discovers her parents want to force her to marry a man she’s never met”–Provided by publisher.

 

X: A Novel. Shabazz, Ilyasah and Magoon, Kekla. (2015) Somerville, Mass: Candlewick Press. “Malcolm Little’s parents have always told him that he can achieve anything, but from what he can tell, that’s a pack of lies–after all, his father’s been murdered, his mother’s been taken away, and his dreams of becoming a lawyer have gotten him laughed out of school. There’s no point in trying, he figures, and lured by the nightlife of Boston and New York, he escapes into a world of fancy suits, jazz, girls, and reefer”–Jacket flap.


 

 

 

 

Registration


Registration will be open October 6, 2015 to December 11, 2015.

EVERY team must register online and EVERY school that registers will incur a non-refundable $10.00 state registration fee.  You will receive a reply from your registration giving directions as to where to send your registration fee.  If there is more than one school to register in a school district, there should be a district representative to collect the state fee, so that one check from the district can be sent to HRRB with a list of the schools in the district that have paid. All counties in Georgia (except DeKalb) will need to download the fee registration form and follow the directions.

Forms


DeKalb County Team Registration Only

DeKalb County Volunteers Registration Only

Georgia Team Registration