DeKalb County School District

Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl

Home : Sponsorship : Volunteers Online Training : State Champions : Permission Forms : Sample Questions : HRRB Framework : T-Shirts : Feedback

Helen Ruffin

1935-2014

The Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl (HRRB)

A DeKalb “Grassroots Movement” That Has Become A Statewide Reading Motivator

Mrs. Ruffin and the DeKalb Reading Bowl: Mrs. Helen Ruffin, a dynamic and innovative Library Media Specialist at Sky Haven Elementary School in DeKalb County, created a unique reading competition in 1986. It was called The Reading Bowl and, in a competitive game format, questioned students about the content of the 20 Georgia Book Award Nominees each year. Her vision was to have teams, comprised of students from different schools, compete to test their knowledge of the selected books.

This idea came to her after serving on the Georgia Book Award Nomination Committee at the University of Georgia, in 1985. This book award began in the Department of Language Education at the University of Georgia’s College of Education and its purpose, according to their website is, “to foster a love of reading in the children of Georgia, and to introduce them to books of literary excellence”. From this experience Mrs. Ruffin shared her vision with her colleagues who embraced the idea and helped her press forward.

In 2000, after Mrs. Ruffin’s retirement, several Library Media Specialists formed the DeKalb County Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl (HRRB). Other school systems in Georgia heard about this unique reading initiative and soon wanted to join in the competition.

Creating a state-wide reading initiative: In 2003-2004 the Georgia Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl (HRRB) Steering Committee was created comprised of members from The Georgia Association of Educators (GAE) and the Georgia Library Media Association (GLMA).

With the help of this Steering Committee, the Georgia Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl (HRRB) is now open to students in grades 4-12 across the state. Elementary and middle school students read and are quizzed on the 20 Georgia Book Award Nominees, while high school students read and are quizzed on the 20 Georgia Peach Teen Book Award Nominees. The books change yearly.

Forming Georgia Districts and Regions: Today, the Georgia HRRB includes six geographic competition regions; North, East, West, Metro, Middle and South. All school districts in Georgia are divided into one of these regions.

From these six regions, two competition divisions have been formed: Division 1, which consists of the North, West and Metro HRRB Regions, and Division 2, which consists of the East, Middle and South HRRB Regions.

During the last few years, over 375 schools throughout Georgia have held competitions at the local school district level and have registered online for regional competitions.

DeKalb Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl Steering Committee Members
Gwen Green — gwendolyn_c_green@dekalbschoolsga.org
Lisa Gurin — lisa_a_gurin@dekalbschoolsga.org
Barbara Hallstrom — barbara_k_hallstrom@dekalbschoolsga.org
Jenny Holloman — jenny_holloman@deklabschoolsga.org
O’Rhonda Ingram — orhonda_d_ingram@dekalbschoolsga.org
Donna Jones — donna_l_jones@dekalbschoolsga.org
Christine King — christine_a_king@dekalbschoolsga.org
HRRB_color_copyright Rose Konouck — rose_m_konouck@dekalbschoolsga.org
Melinda Morin — melinda_j_morin@dekalbschoolsga.org
Sue Ann Prigge — sueann_m_prigge@dekalbschoolsga.org
Anja Tigges — anja_f_tigges@dekalbschoolsga.org

Valerie Ayer, HRRB Liaison — valerie_ayer@dekalbschoolsga.org
Instructional Coordinator, Department of Educational Media & Instructional Materials
Dr. Mary Thomas, Retired, HRRB Consultant

We Salute Mrs. Helen Ruffin, Founder of the Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl and the HRRB Steering Committee members for their contributions to the literary development of Georgia students!

 

DeKalb Reading Bowl

To participate in the Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl, elementary and middle school students must read the current Georgia Children’s Book Award Nominees. The Georgia Book Award Nominees is the Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl’s official reading list.

High school students must read the Georgia Peach Book Award for Teen Readers Nominees for the current year which is the official reading list of the Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl.

 

Rules of the Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl

  • Each school will participate in six rounds.
  • Each round will consist of 10 questions.
  • Alternates may be substituted between rounds.
  • Teams will receive 10 points for each answer.
  • There will be no penalties for wrong answers.
  • There will be five members on a team and up to five alternates.
  • A school may have no more than one team.

The winners will be determined in the following manner: The teams with the highest total points from all six of their rounds will be the winners. In case of a tie, the teams who are tied will be co-winners. Winning teams will receive a trophy for their school. In the case of a tie, neither team will receive the trophy that day. Another trophy will be purchased and engraved and presented to each of those teams at a later agreed upon date. There will be a first place, second place and third place winning teams (teams in case of a tie).

Team Selection Strategies

  • Recruit a teacher, paraprofessional and or parent to be co-sponsor and coach.
  • Encourage all students to read the Georgia Book Award Nominees
  • Teachers and sponsors make requirement for certain number of books to be read.
  • Secure AR (accelerated reader) test
  • Make multiple copies available
  • Use vendors such as Baker& Taylor, Bound to Stay Bound, Follett, Permabound, and others that carry GA. Book Award copies ( paperbacks)
  • Buy books on tape
  • Run a power point kiosk on workstations
  • Encourage purchase of personal copies on “tax free days”
  • Establish a “literary club” or type of “lunch bunch” where interested students can read and discus the books on the Georgia Award list .
  • Discuss each book with students as to its theme, plot, characters, settings, etc.
  • Give brief “book talks”
  • By December, at the latest, select possible team and alternates
    • Ask teachers for suggestions of students
    • Give test on the 20 books
    • Hold a school level reading bowl
    • Encourage input from students
  • January or before, meet with team at designated time to review books and practice questions
    • Students, sponsors, coaches make practice questions
    • Use “extra” students not on team as “coaches”
    • Encourage students to read at least four (4) of the nominees

Buzzers may be located by searching the Internet for Quiz Pro Systems.

Dates & Locations


Listed below are the dates and locations for the DeKalb and Metro Region Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl Competitions. All other regions should contact their Regional Coordinator listed under the Divisions and Regions tab for their competition dates.


DeKalb HRRB — January 30, 2016 at Tucker High School

Regional HRRB — February 13, 2016 at Clayton State University

Divisional HRRB — February 27, 2016 at TBA

State HRRB — March 19, 2016 at University of Georgia (Children’s Literature Conference)

Divisions & Regions


There are six Georgia Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl (HRRB) Regions which are grouped into two HRRB Divisions. The Divisions and Regions are listed below.


HRRB Division 1 North, West, Metro HRRB Regions

HRRB North Region School Districts Coordinator: Laura Seymour, northhrrb@gmail.com Bartow, Calhoun City, Cartersville City, Catoosa, Chattooga, Cherokee, Chickamauga City, Dade, Dalton City, Dawson, Fannin, Forsyth, Gainesville City, Gilmer, Gordon, Habersham, Hall, Lumpkin, Murray, Pickens, Rabun, Towns, Trion City, Union, Walker, White, Whitfield, and non-public school organizations. (See HRRB Framework for Rules of Inclusion.)

HRRB West Region School Districts Coordinators: Jean Cook, Stephen Williams, westhrrb@gmail.com Bremen City, Butts, Carroll City Schools, Carroll County, Chattahoochee, Cobb, Coweta, Douglas, Floyd, Haralson, Harris, Heard, Lamar, Marietta City, Marion, Meriwether, Muscogee, Paulding, Pike, Polk, Rome City, Spalding, Talbot, Taylor, Thomaston-Upson, Troup, and non-public school organizations (See HRRB Framework for Rules of Inclusion.) HRRB Metro Region School Districts Coordinator: Sue Ann Prigge, metrohrrb@gmail.com Atlanta City, Buford City, Clayton, Decatur City, DeKalb, Fulton, Gwinnett, Henry, Newton, Rockdale, and non-public school organizations (See HRRB Framework for Rules of Inclusion.)

HRRB Division 2 East, South, Middle HRRB Regions

HRRB East Region School Districts Coordinators: Terrie Gribanow , Verley Dotson, easthrrb@gmail.com Banks, Barrow, Burke, Candler, Clarke, Columbia, Commerce City, Effingham, Elbert, Emanuel, Franklin, Glascock, Greene, Hancock, Hart, Jackson, Jefferson, Jefferson City, Jenkins, Lincoln, Madison, McDuffie, Oconee, Oglethorpe, Richmond, Screven, Social Circle City, Stephens, Taliaferro, Treutlen, Walton, Warren, Wilkes, and non-public school organizations (See HRRB Framework for Rules of Inclusion.)

HRRB South Region School Districts Coordinators: Jaime Rearley, Shan Peters, southhrrb@gmail.com Appling, Atkinson, Bacon, Baker, Ben Hill, Berrien, Brantley, Brooks, Bryan, Calhoun, Camden, Charlton, Chatham, Clay, Clinch, Coffee, Colquitt, Cook, Crisp, Decatur, Dodge, Dooly, Dougherty, Early, Echols, Evans, Glynn, Grady, Irwin, Lanier, Jeff Davis, Lee, Liberty, Long, Lowndes, McIntosh, Miller, Mitchell, Pelham City, Pierce, Pulaski, Quitman, Randolph, Seminole, Stewart, Tattnall, Telfair, Terrell, Thomas, Thomasville City, Tift, Toombs, Turner, Valdosta City, Vidalia City, Ware, Wayne, Webster, Wheeler, Wilcox, Worth, and non-public school organizations (See HRRB Framework for Rules of Inclusion.)

HRRB Middle Region School Districts Coordinator: Doreen Smith, middlehrrb@gmail.com Baldwin, Bibb, Bleckley, Bulloch, Crawford, Dublin City, Fayette, Houston, Jasper, Johnson, Jones, Laurens, Macon, Monroe, Montgomery, Morgan, Peach, Putnam, Schley, Sumter, Twiggs, Washington, Wilkinson, and non-public school organizations (See HRRB Framework for Rules of Inclusion.)

Booklists

The Georgia Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl will only use the original 20 titles on the Georgia Book Awards Nominees list and the 20 titles on the Ga. Peach Teen Book Award Nominees list. There are 17 titles for the elementary students and all twenty titles from the GBA will be used for middle school students during the 2015-2016 school term.

Elementary Booklist

The Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl uses the suggested GBA list of 17 titles (2015-2016) for elementary schools. All 20 titles will be used for the middle school list. The following list is for elementary schools.

Prairie Evers. Airgood, E. (2012). New York: Nancy Paulsen Books.

Ten-year-old Prairie is happy being home-schooled and raising her flock of chickens, so transferring to regular school is a big change, but fortunately she meets a wonderful friend.

 

This journal belongs to Ratchet. Cavanaugh, N. (2013) Naperville, IL: Sourcebooks Jabberwocky.

Eleven-year-old Ratchet determines to make a friend, save a park, and find her own definition of normal. She tells her story through the assignments in her homeschool language arts journal.

 

The Saturday boy. Fleming, D. (2013). New York: Viking.

Ten-year-old Albie has never been the smartest, tallest, best at gym, greatest artist, or most musical in his class, as his parents keep reminding him, but new nanny Calista helps him uncover his strengths and take pride in himself.

 

Absolutely almost. Graff, L. (2014). New York: Philomel.

Ten-year-old Albie has never been the smartest, tallest, best at gym, greatest artist, or most musical in his class, as his parents keep reminding him, but new nanny Calista helps him uncover his strengths and take pride in himself.

 

Prisoner B-3087. Gratz, A. (2013). New York: Scholastic.

Based on the life of Jack Gruener, this book relates his story of survival from the Nazi occupation of Krakow, when he was eleven, through a succession of concentration camps, to the final liberation of Dachau.

 

Hope is a Ferris wheel. Herrera, R. (2014). New York: Amulet/Abrams.

After moving from Oregon to a trailer park in California, ten-year-old Star participates in a poetry club, where she learns some important lessons about herself and her own hopes and dreams for the future.

 

The fourteenth goldfish. Holm, J.L. (2014). New York: Random House.

Ellie’s scientist grandfather has discovered a way to reverse aging, and consequently has turned into a teenager–which makes for complicated relationships when he moves in with Ellie and her mother, his daughter.

 

The mark of the dragonfly. Johnson, J. (2014). New York: Delacorte.

Since her father’s death in a factory in the Dragonfly territories, thirteen-year-old Piper has eked out a living as a scrapper in Merrow Kingdom, but the arrival of a mysterious girl sends her on a dangerous journey to distant lands.

 

How to outrun a crocodile when your shoes are untied. Keating, J. (2014). Naperville, IL: Sourcebooks Jabberwocky.

When twelve-year-old Ana’s zoologist parents move the whole family into the zoo, the Sneerers–the clan of carnivorous female predators in her class–have even more ammunition to make her life miserable, although she tries to act like a chameleon and fade into the background.

 

Upside down in the middle of nowhere. Lamana, J.T. (2014). San Francisco, CA: Chronicle.

At the end of August 2005, ten-year-old Armani is looking forward to her birthday party in the Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans, where she and her extended family live, but Hurricane Katrina is on the way, bringing destruction and tragedy in its wake.

 

The vine basket. La Valley, J. (2013). New York: Clarion.

Life has been hard for fourteen-year-old Mehrigul, a member of the Uyghur tribal group scorned by the Chinese communist regime, so when an American offers to buy all the baskets she can make in three weeks, Mehrigul strives for a better future for herself and her family despite her father’s opposition.

 

A snicker of magic. Lloyd, N. (2014). New York: Scholastic.

The Pickles are new to Midnight Gulch, Tennessee, a town which legend says was once magic–but Felicity is convinced the magic is still there, and with the help of her new friend Jonah the Beedle she hopes to bring the magic back.

 

Half a chance. Lord, C. (2014). New York: Scholastic.

Lucy, with her mother and her photographer father, has just moved to a small rural community in New Hampshire, and with her new friend Nate she plans to spend the summer taking photos for a contest, but pictures sometimes reveal more than people are willing to see.

Nickel Bay Nick. Pitchford, D. (2013). New York: Putnam.

When eleven-year-old Sam gets into trouble and is forced to work for his reclusive neighbor Mr. Wells, he soon finds out that his mysterious new acquaintance hides many secrets of his own–including one that will change Sam’s life forever.

 

The girl from Felony Bay. Thompson, J.E. (2013). Burlington, MA: Walden Pond Press.

When Abbey’s father falls into a coma and is accused of a crime he didn’t commit, Abbey sets out to prove his innocence–and repay a century-old debt.

 

Loot: How to steal a fortune. Watson, J. (2014). New York: Scholastic.

When Abbey’s father falls into a coma and is accused of a crime he didn’t commit, Abbey sets out to prove his innocence–and repay a century-old debt.

 

Brown girl dreaming. Woodson, J. (2014). New York: Nancy Paulsen Books.

The author shares her childhood memories and reveals the first sparks that ignited her writing career in free-verse poems about growing up in the North and South.

Middle School Booklist

All 20 titles of Georgia Book Award Nominees are used for the Georgia Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl Middle School Division for 2015-2016 school term.

Prairie Evers. Airgood, E. (2012). New York: Nancy Paulsen Books.

Ten-year-old Prairie is happy being home-schooled and raising her flock of chickens, so transferring to regular school is a big change, but fortunately she meets a wonderful friend.

 

This journal belongs to Ratchet. Cavanaugh, N. (2013) Naperville, IL: Sourcebooks Jabberwocky.

Eleven-year-old Ratchet determines to make a friend, save a park, and find her own definition of normal. She tells her story through the assignments in her homeschool language arts journal.

 

A bird on Water Street. Dulemba, E. (2014). San Francisco, CA: Little Pickle Press.

A coming of age story about Jack, a boy growing up in a Southern Appalachian town environmentally devastated by a century of poor copper-mining practices and pollution. Jack is opposed to the mine where so many of his relatives have died, but how can he tell that to his dad who wants him to follow in the family trade? Jack just wants his dad safe and the land returned to its pre-mining glory with trees, birds, frogs, and nature–like he’s learning about in school. After Jack’s uncle is killed in a mining accident and the Company implements a massive layoff, the union organizes and the miners go on strike. It seems Jack’s wish is coming true. But the cost may be the ruin of his home and everything he loves.

 

The Saturday boy. Fleming, D. (2013). New York: Viking.

Ten-year-old Albie has never been the smartest, tallest, best at gym, greatest artist, or most musical in his class, as his parents keep reminding him, but new nanny Calista helps him uncover his strengths and take pride in himself.

 

Absolutely almost. Graff, L. (2014). New York: Philomel.

Ten-year-old Albie has never been the smartest, tallest, best at gym, greatest artist, or most musical in his class, as his parents keep reminding him, but new nanny Calista helps him uncover his strengths and take pride in himself.

 

Prisoner B-3087. Gratz, A. (2013). New York: Scholastic.

Based on the life of Jack Gruener, this book relates his story of survival from the Nazi occupation of Krakow, when he was eleven, through a succession of concentration camps, to the final liberation of Dachau.

 

Hope is a Ferris wheel. Herrera, R. (2014). New York: Amulet/Abrams.

After moving from Oregon to a trailer park in California, ten-year-old Star participates in a poetry club, where she learns some important lessons about herself and her own hopes and dreams for the future.

 

The fourteenth goldfish. Holm, J.L. (2014). New York: Random House.

Ellie’s scientist grandfather has discovered a way to reverse aging, and consequently has turned into a teenager–which makes for complicated relationships when he moves in with Ellie and her mother, his daughter.

 

The mark of the dragonfly. Johnson, J. (2014). New York: Delacorte.

Since her father’s death in a factory in the Dragonfly territories, thirteen-year-old Piper has eked out a living as a scrapper in Merrow Kingdom, but the arrival of a mysterious girl sends her on a dangerous journey to distant lands.

 

How to outrun a crocodile when your shoes are untied. Keating, J. (2014). Naperville, IL: Sourcebooks Jabberwocky.

When twelve-year-old Ana’s zoologist parents move the whole family into the zoo, the Sneerers–the clan of carnivorous female predators in her class–have even more ammunition to make her life miserable, although she tries to act like a chameleon and fade into the background.

 

Upside down in the middle of nowhere. Lamana, J.T. (2014). San Francisco, CA: Chronicle.

At the end of August 2005, ten-year-old Armani is looking forward to her birthday party in the Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans, where she and her extended family live, but Hurricane Katrina is on the way, bringing destruction and tragedy in its wake.

 

The vine basket. La Valley, J. (2013). New York: Clarion.

Life has been hard for fourteen-year-old Mehrigul, a member of the Uyghur tribal group scorned by the Chinese communist regime, so when an American offers to buy all the baskets she can make in three weeks, Mehrigul strives for a better future for herself and her family despite her father’s opposition.

 

A snicker of magic. Lloyd, N. (2014). New York: Scholastic.

The Pickles are new to Midnight Gulch, Tennessee, a town which legend says was once magic–but Felicity is convinced the magic is still there, and with the help of her new friend Jonah the Beedle she hopes to bring the magic back.

 

Half a chance. Lord, C. (2014). New York: Scholastic.

Lucy, with her mother and her photographer father, has just moved to a small rural community in New Hampshire, and with her new friend Nate she plans to spend the summer taking photos for a contest, but pictures sometimes reveal more than people are willing to see.

 

Sylo. MacHale, D.J. (2013). New York: Razorbill/Penguin.

They came from the sky parachuting out of military helicopters to invade Tucker Pierce’s idyllic hometown on Pemberwick Island, Maine. They call themselves SYLO and they are a secret branch of the U.S. Navy. SYLO’s commander, Captain Granger, informs Pemberwick residents that the island has been hit by a lethal virus and must be quarantined. Now Pemberwick is cut off from the outside world.

 

The revolution of Evelyn Serrano. Manzano, S. (2012). New York: Scholastic.

It is 1969 in Spanish Harlem, and fourteen-year-old Evelyn Serrano is trying hard to break free from her conservative Puerto Rican surroundings, but when her activist grandmother comes to stay and the neighborhood protests start, things get a lot more complicated–and dangerous.

 

Nickel Bay Nick. Pitchford, D. (2013). New York: Putnam.

When eleven-year-old Sam gets into trouble and is forced to work for his reclusive neighbor Mr. Wells, he soon finds out that his mysterious new acquaintance hides many secrets of his own–including one that will change Sam’s life forever.

 

The girl from Felony Bay. Thompson, J.E. (2013). Burlington, MA: Walden Pond Press.

When Abbey’s father falls into a coma and is accused of a crime he didn’t commit, Abbey sets out to prove his innocence–and repay a century-old debt.

 

Loot: How to steal a fortune. Watson, J. (2014). New York: Scholastic.

When Abbey’s father falls into a coma and is accused of a crime he didn’t commit, Abbey sets out to prove his innocence–and repay a century-old debt.

 

Brown girl dreaming. Woodson, J. (2014). New York: Nancy Paulsen Books.

The author shares her childhood memories and reveals the first sparks that ignited her writing career in free-verse poems about growing up in the North and South.


 

High School Booklist

This list is used in the Georgia Helen Ruffin Reading Bowl for the high school competition and will be promoted in public libraries as part of the Vacation Reading Program.Georgia Peach Book Award for Teen Readers Committee.A committee of public and school librarians has compiled a list of 20 outstanding books for high school aged students to consider for the annual Georgia Peach Award For Teen Readers. Georgia Peach Book Award for Teen Readers accepts new members each spring. Committee members must be current Georgia high school media specialists/teacher-librarians or Georgia public library youth services staff.Chair: Dr. Kathi Vanderbilt,Cobb County Library Media Specialist and Natalie Couch, Vice-Chair South Columbus Public Library. For a complete list of committee members go to: http://georgiapeachaward.org/ reading-committee.


Are You Experienced?  Jordan Sonnenblick.  Feiwel and Friends (2013).

Fifteen-year-old guitar player Rich cannot get his dad to tell him about his late uncle, so he decides to take his father’s most prized possession, a guitar signed by Jimi Hendrix, which transports him back to 1969 Woodstock where he encounters his fifteen-year-old-dad and his uncle who is alive.


Caged Warrior. Sitomer, Alan L.  Disney Hyperion (2014).

 

From age three, McCutcheon Daniels, now sixteen, has been trained in Mixed Martial Arts and must keep winning to feed his five-year-old sister and father, but chance presents an opportunity to get out of the Detroit slums using his brain instead of his fighting skills.


A Death-Struck Year.  Lucier, Makiia.  Houghton (2014).

Includes bibliographical references (page 280). When the Spanish influenza epidemic reaches Portland, Oregon, in 1918, seventeen-year-old Cleo leaves behind the comfort of her boarding school to work for the Red Cross. eath-Struck Year. 


Everything Leads to You.  LaCour, Nina.  Dutton (2014).

While working as a film production designer in Los Angeles, Emi Price finds a mysterious letter from a silver screen legend which leads her to Ava, who is about to expand Emi’s understanding of family, acceptance, and true romance.


Fake ID.  Giles, Lamar.  Amistad (2014).

“An African-American teen in the Witness Protection Program moves to a new town and finds himself trying to solve a murder mystery when his first iend is found dead”–Provided by publisher.


Faking Normal.  Stevens, Courtney.  Harper (2014).

Alexi Littrell hasn’t told anyone what happened to her over the summer. When Bodee Lennox, the quiet and awkward boy next door, comes to live with the Littrells, Alexi discovers an unlikely friend in “the Kool-Aid Kid,” who has secrets of his own. As they lean on each other for support, Alexi gives him the strength to deal with his past, and Bodee helps her find the courage to finally face the truth.


Far From You.  Sharpe, Tess.  Disney-Hyperion (2014).

“After Sophie Winters survives a brutal attack in which her best friend, Mina, is murdered, she sets out to find the killer. At the same time she must prove she is free of her past Oxy addiction and in no way to blame for Mina’s death”–Provided by publisher.


Free to Fall.  Miller, Lauren.  Harper Teen (2014).

“In a near-future world where everyone is controlled by their smartphones, sixteen-year-old Rory Vaughn suddenly begins listening to the voice within–which kids are taught to ignore–and discovers a terrible plot at the heart of the corporation that makes the devices”–Provided by publisher.


Girls Like Us.  Giles, Gail. Candlewick (2014).

“Graduating from their school’s special education program, Quincy and Biddy are placed together in their first independent apartment and discover unexpected things they have in common in the face of past challenges and a harrowing trauma”–OCLC.


Hostage Three.  Lake, Nick.  Bloomsbury USA (2013).

Seventeen-year-old Amy, her father, and her stepmother become hostages when Somalian pirates seize their yacht, but although she builds a bond with one of her captors it becomes brutally clear that the price of life and its value are two very different things.


I’ll Give You the Sun.  Nelson, Jandy.  Dial (Sept. 2014).

“A story of first love, family, loss, and betrayal told from different points in time, and in separate voices, by artists Jude and her twin brother Noah”–Provided by publisher.


Jackaby.  Ritter, William.  Algonquin (2014).

ewly arrived in 1892 New England, Abigail Rook becomes assistant to R. F. Jackaby, an investigator of the unexplained with the ability to see supernatural beings, and she helps him delve into a case of serial murder which, Jackaby is convinced, is due to a nonhuman creature.


Killer of Enemies.  Bruchac, Joseph.  TU Books (2013).

Includes bibliographical references (page 361). “In a world that has barely survived an apocalypse that leaves it with pre-twentieth century technology, Lozen is a monster hunter for four tyrants who are holding her family hostage”–Provided by publisher.


Nearly Gone.  Cosimano, Elle.  Penguin:Kathy Dawson Books (2014).

A math-whiz from a trailer park discovers she’s the only student capable of unravelling complex clues left by a serial killer who’s systematically getting rid of her classmates.”–Provided by publisher.


Phoenix Island.  Dixon, John.  Gallery (2014).

When a tough sixteen-year-old boxing champ sentenced to an isolated boot camp discovers it is actually a mercenary training facility turning “throwaway children” into scientifically enhanced killers, he risks everything to save his friends and stop a madman bent on global destruction.


Say What You Will.   McGovern, Cammie.    HarperTeen(2014).

“Born with cerebral palsy, Amy can’t walk without a walker, talk without a voice box, or even fully control her facial expressions. Plagued by obsessive-compulsive disorder, Matthew is consumed with repeated thoughts, neurotic rituals, and crippling fear. Both in desperate need of someone to help them reach out to the world, Amy and Matthew are more alike than either ever realized. When Amy decides to hire student aides to help her in her senior year at Coral Hills High School, these two teens are thrust into each other’s lives. As they begin to spend time with each other, what started as a blossoming friendship eventually grows into something neither expected”–Amazon.com.


Scar Boys.   Vlahos, Len.  Egmont (2014).

Written as a college admission essay, eighteen-year-old Harry Jones recounts a childhood defined by the hideous scars he hid behind, and how forming a band brought self-confidence, friendship, and his first kiss.


We Were Liars.  Lockhart, E.  Delacorte Press (5.13.14 pub)

Spending the summers on her family’s private island off the coast of Massachusetts with her cousins and a special boy named Gat, teenaged Cadence struggles to remember what happened during her fifteenth summer.


 

What I Thought Was True.   Fitzpatrick, Huntley.  Penguin: Dial (2014).

“17-year-old Gwen Castle is a working-class girl determined to escape her small island town, but when rich-kid Cass Somers, with whom she has a complicated romantic history, shows up, she’s forced to reassess her feelings about her loving, complex family, her lifelong best friends, her wealthy employer, the place she lives, and the boy she can’t admit she loves”–Provided by publisher.


When I Was the Greatest.  Reynolds, Jason.  Atheneum (2014).

Ali lives in Bed-Stuy, a Brooklyn neighborhood known for guns and drugs, but he and his sister, Jazz, and their neighbors, Needles and Noodles, stay out of trouble until they go to the wrong party, where one gets badly hurt and another leaves with a target on his back.


 

 

 

 

Registration


Registration will begin in October 2015.

EVERY team needs to register online and EVERY school that registers will incur a non-refundable $10.00 state registration fee. If there is more than one school to register in a school system, there should be a system representative to collect the state fee, so that one check from the system can be sent to HRRB with a list of the schools in the system that have paid. Be sure to download the fee registration form and follow the directions on the form.

Forms


Volunteer Registration

Georgia Team Registration (all teams register here except for DeKalb teams)

DeKalb Team Registration Only